Canada Reaffirms Commitment to Renewable Fuels

Canadian federal regulations now require 5 per cent renewable fuel content in gasoline. The law came into effect on December 15, 2010 and highlight’s Canada’s commitment to renewable fuels.

“This initiative is one of Canada’s contributions to the fight against climate change,” said the Honourable Gerry Ritz, Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food and Minister for the Canadian Wheat Board. “We are proud to be moving forward with the Renewable Fuels Regulations as they will benefit Canada’s economy, our farmers and our environment.”

These Regulations are one pillar of the Government’s broader Renewable Fuels Strategy. The Strategy will establish a demand for renewable fuels that will help stimulate Canadian biofuels production, create jobs and new market opportunities for farmers, and help create jobs in rural communities, while accelerating the commercialization of new biofuel technologies.

“This federal 5 per cent requirement is estimated to result in a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions of one megatonne per year over and above the reductions attributable to existing provincial requirements-the equivalent of taking a quarter million vehicles off the road,” said Environment Canada Minister, the Honourable John Baird.

“Biofuels can help reduce greenhouse gas emissions and air pollutants while sustaining economic growth and development,” said the Honourable Christian Paradis, Minister of Natural Resources. “In the midst of a global economic slowdown, our Government is working to accelerate key investments in Canada in order to create jobs and help stimulate our economy.”

These Regulations are a key initiative in support of the Government of Canada’s commitment to reduce Canada’s total greenhouse gas emissions by 17 per cent from 2005 levels by 2020. In addition, the Government of Canada has finalized vehicle tailpipe emissions regulations under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, that are aligned with those of the United States, and is working to do the same for heavy-duty vehicles.

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